The cripples among us

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rlmjob:

okay but this one is all too real

rlmjob:

okay but this one is all too real

(Source: yodiscrepo)

mistress-laufeyson:

ramon-salamander:

witchlingfumbles:

GUISE

GUISE

IF YOU HIT “X+C” IT SHUTS OFF EVERY GIF ON YOUR DASH

EVERY SINGLE ONE TURNS TO A LITTLE GREY BOX WITH A LOCK

GUISE

TUMBLR HAS MADE ITSELF SAFE FOR EPILEPTICS

PASS IT ON

I BRING FORTH THIS KNOWLEDGE TO ANY FELLOW TUMBLRITES/SEIZURE-PRONE PEOPLE THAT MAY FOLLOW ME

KINDLY THANK THE OP FOR THIS KNOWLEDGE

I AM A HUMBLE MESSENGER

oh i thought this would be useful for when your parents walk by but ok

(Source: nosuchthingasfiction)

atlasobscura:

abandonedusa:

Lee Plaza Hotel
Detroit, Michigan

Gorgeous!

Private Violence: up to 75% of abused women who are murdered are killed after they leave their partners

"We need to teach girls and young women to look for the warning signs and to know what they are early on and to be clear that jealousy and love aren’t the same thing. That when he starts to do things to make her feel controlled, telling her that she can’t hang out with her friends any more, [those are the warning signs]."

Trying to outrun a flare I know is coming…

whatshouldwecallchronicillness:

image

casualblessings:

May you find relief from the bad memories of your past that make you feel unworthy

exgynocraticgrrl:

Gerda Lerner (1920-2013) , former Robinson Edwards Professor Emerita of History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Gerda Lerner (1920-2013)  Women and History (excerpt)
-- A Thinking Allowed DVD w/ Jeffrey Mishlove

neurosciencestuff:

Amputees discern familiar sensations across prosthetic hand
Even before he lost his right hand to an industrial accident 4 years ago, Igor Spetic had family open his medicine bottles. Cotton balls give him goose bumps.
Now, blindfolded during an experiment, he feels his arm hairs rise when a researcher brushes the back of his prosthetic hand with a cotton ball.
Spetic, of course, can’t feel the ball. But patterns of electric signals are sent by a computer into nerves in his arm and to his brain, which tells him different. “I knew immediately it was cotton,” he said.
That’s one of several types of sensation Spetic, of Madison, Ohio, can feel with the prosthetic system being developed by Case Western Reserve University and the Louis Stokes Cleveland Veterans Affairs Medical Center.
Spetic was excited just to “feel” again, and quickly received an unexpected benefit. The phantom pain he’d suffered, which he’s described as a vice crushing his closed fist, subsided almost completely. A second patient, who had less phantom pain after losing his right hand and much of his forearm in an accident, said his, too, is nearly gone.
Read more

neurosciencestuff:

Amputees discern familiar sensations across prosthetic hand

Even before he lost his right hand to an industrial accident 4 years ago, Igor Spetic had family open his medicine bottles. Cotton balls give him goose bumps.

Now, blindfolded during an experiment, he feels his arm hairs rise when a researcher brushes the back of his prosthetic hand with a cotton ball.

Spetic, of course, can’t feel the ball. But patterns of electric signals are sent by a computer into nerves in his arm and to his brain, which tells him different. “I knew immediately it was cotton,” he said.

That’s one of several types of sensation Spetic, of Madison, Ohio, can feel with the prosthetic system being developed by Case Western Reserve University and the Louis Stokes Cleveland Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

Spetic was excited just to “feel” again, and quickly received an unexpected benefit. The phantom pain he’d suffered, which he’s described as a vice crushing his closed fist, subsided almost completely. A second patient, who had less phantom pain after losing his right hand and much of his forearm in an accident, said his, too, is nearly gone.

Read more

rollership:

Too much blood on their hands

rollership:

Too much blood on their hands

(Source: antinwo)

vintagegal:

Eartha Kitt c. 1954